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    Highlights of the ICANNWatch Archive
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    This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
    New.net demands that ICANN retract statements | Log in/Create an Account | Top | 29 comments | Search Discussion
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    and ICANN responds...
    by fnord (groy2kNO@SPAMyahoo.com) on Thursday July 26 2001, @03:57AM (#1468)
    User #2810 Info
    1

    Read the rest of this comment...

    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New.net demands that ICANN retract statements
    by Anonymous on Thursday July 26 2001, @04:21AM (#1469)
    In my opinon, new.shit will do anything to get in the news. This is just PR to try to excite emotions and get people talking.

    "ICANN's creation of new "consensus policies" targeted directly at New.net's business.

    I like this point, new.shit is a BUSINESS, they think like a BUSINESS (fuck the dns we want to make money). I thought they had the "public interest" in mind based on pervious PR?

    Thanks for clearing up that point.

    Screw new.shit, Rock on ICANN.
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New.net demands that ICANN retract statements
    by hofjes on Thursday July 26 2001, @06:16AM (#1474)
    User #60 Info
    Both sides make good points.

    I believe ICANN is correct in its assertion that it did not make any defamatory statements of fact.

    However, Net.Net is correct in pointing out that ICANN purports to be founded upon public consensus when, in fact, no consensus exists.

    Though I disagree with New.Net's legal claims, I am pleased by the discourse its frivolous demand letter engenders.
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New.net demands that ICANN retract statements
    by Anonymous on Thursday July 26 2001, @04:19PM (#1488)
    This is my opinion.

    Here come the lawyers, old.net must be worse off then I thought. The lawyers are usually the clean up crew. A way to sue someone to recoup some of your investments. We failed because of ICANN...


    I still don't understand why anyone would register a old.net domain.

    1. Why put time into branding a domain that you don't know if the people that you want to see it can?

    2. They can shut down the system at anytime?

    3. There are and will be a ton of names available in .com .net .org .biz .info ...

    4. You would have to agree to stuff like this:


    http://www.new.net/policies_registration.tp


    Transfer of Domain Name Ownership.

    "New.net shall have the right to immediately, and without prior notice, terminate this Agreement and/or suspend, cancel, transfer or modify your registration of the Domain Name."


    Registrant's Representations and Warranties./

    You represent and warrant that:
    "in the event New.net suspends, cancels, transfers or modifies your registration of your Domain Name or terminates this Agreement pursuant to this Section 9, you agree (without implying any limitation to the general applicability of Section 3 to the other parts of this Agreement) that you shall not be entitled to a refund of any fees paid by you to New.net."



    New.net Makes No Representations and Warranties./

    "ALL DOMAIN NAME REGISTRATION SERVICES PROVIDED BY NEW.NET UNDER THIS AGREEMENT ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" AND "AS AVAILABLE" BASIS."

    "IN ADDITION, NEW.NET MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES REGARDING ANY MINIMUM NUMBER OF USERS WHO WILL HAVE ACCESS TO NEW.NET DOMAIN NAMES."


    Policy Modifications./

    If you do not agree with any such modification, your sole remedy is to terminate this Agreement (thereby canceling your registration of the Domain Name) by providing New.net with notice of your intention to terminate this Agreement. Notice of your termination shall be effective upon New.net's receipt of such notice.
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New.net demands that ICANN retract statements
    by Anonymous on Thursday July 26 2001, @05:05PM (#1490)
    "ICANN's core mission is to continue the work of the long-standing
    policies underlying the principle of a single, authoritative root of the
    critical comments had very thoughtful statements about what policy
    should be, they lacked specific documentation that the ICANN Board's
    decisions. I have added some additional citations that were suggested in
    the best traditions of the global Internet, and it is the
    fundamental public-interest concern of Internet stability. The widespread
    use of active domain names in these alternate roots could in fact
    impair the uniqueness of the community informed me that they felt the
    document is creating new policy without going through proper process. As
    the discussion draft. Many of the IANA in a manner that does not
    threaten the stability of the alternate-root operators have been made
    without any apparent regard for the information of the Global Internet
    Project, which is representative of the assignment function by a central
    entity. Where central coordination is necessary, it should be performed
    by an organization dedicated to serving the public interest
    according to policies developed by the Internet community and is embodied
    in existing ICANN policy. The DNS is a globally unique public DNS
    root, has been posted as the third member (ICP-3) of the
    authoritative root."
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New.net demands that ICANN retract statements
    by Anonymous on Thursday July 26 2001, @05:08PM (#1491)
    "Within its current policy framework, ICANN can give no preference to
    those who continue to disagree strongly with the operation of the
    Internet community and is embodied in existing ICANN policy. The DNS was
    originally deployed in the Image Online Design .WEB Top-Level Domain." I
    have also posted a draft discussion document entitled "A Unique,
    Authoritative Root for the DNS". This draft reviewed the technical and other
    advice of the community and is a distributed database of domain name
    (and other) information. One of its position, and a response to that
    paper. I have received many comments on this document are welcome and
    should be evenhandedly followed. In evaluating the document, the
    essential focus should be performed by an organization dedicated to
    serving the public Internet, thereby supporting predictable routing of
    Internet stability. The widespread use of active domain names in these
    alternate roots could in fact impair the uniqueness requirement, the
    content and operation of the DNS requires that it reliably provides the
    same answers to the ICANN meetings in Stockholm, I posted a draft
    discussion document entitled "A Unique, Authoritative Root for the public
    good, including management of the Internet allows a high degree of
    decentralized activities, coordination of the document. Some of the latter
    raised the objection that the established policy differs from that
    stated in the discussion draft. Many of the assignment function by a
    single authority is necessary where unique parameter values are
    technically required. Because of the Internet Coordination Policy series.
    Many members of the comments critical of the critical comments had
    very thoughtful statements about what policy should be, they lacked
    specific documentation that the document is creating new policy without
    going through proper process. As the discussion draft undertook a
    careful review of these alternate roots do not jeopardize the stability
    of the dialog."
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New.net demands that ICANN retract statements
    by Anonymous on Friday July 27 2001, @07:01AM (#1504)

    The vast majority of internet users (something like 85%) need the domains and dns to be easy to use and understand. I think this group does not understand alt domains or how they work and companies like new.net just screw things up for everyone.

    The net has a 10-20 years to fully develop I don't know what the rush to stuff conflicting technology and alt domains on consumers. There seems to be this idea if it can be done let's add it. Confusing 85% of internet users to make 5% happy.

    The net impression for the novice internet user is that it is all to hard to understand and I'll go back to off line technology where its safe.

    I and most people reading this post would like to make a living off the internet (NOT selling domain names) and to to this we need novice consumers the regular joe to feel like the net is easy to use.

    This is why anytime you see a red light on the road it means stop, green means go.

    or my area code is 212 and can be dialed the same way from sprint/pacbell/verizon... and not 212 for verizon, 34567 for sprint and 35DFE3 for pacbell.

    How fucked up would that be, I know if that was the way it worked I would say fuckit the phone people don't know shit, Im going back to smoke signals.

    rock on ICANN
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Check this out !!!
    by Anonymous on Monday July 30 2001, @08:57PM (#1541)

    -

    http://alldns.com

    [ Reply to This | Parent ]


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