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    Highlights of the ICANNWatch Archive
    (June 1999 - March 2001)


     
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    Obscenity on the Internet | Log in/Create an Account | Top | 23 comments | Search Discussion
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    .XXX Meeting in .LA With Live Hollywood Porn Stars
    by Anonymous on Tuesday August 16 2005, @06:32AM (#15910)
    .XXX Meeting in .LA With Live Hollywood Porn Stars

    The fall 2005 NANOG meeting will be held October 23-25 in Los Angeles. Join us for our fourth joint meeting with ARIN, the American Registry for Internet Numbers. ARIN manages IP numbers for North America and several islands in the Caribbean and North Atlantic.

    NANOG will meet as usual from Sunday to Tuesday, and ARIN from Wednesday to Friday.

    Tutorials will begin on Sunday afternoon, Oct. 23, at 1:30 p.m. The General Session begins at 9:00 a.m. on Oct. 24, and ends at approximately 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 25. Registration begins in late August, and the fee is $350.

    Meeting Location:
    Hilton Los Angeles/Universal City
    555 Universal Hollywood Drive
    Universal City, California 91608-1001

    Phone: +1-818-506-2500
    Fax: +1-818-509-2058
    Group rate: $128
    Rate expires: October 8
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    Re:.XXX Meeting in .LA With Live Hollywood Porn St
    by Anonymous on Tuesday August 16 2005, @06:34AM (#15911)
    Rodney Joffe

    Rodney Joffe is the Chairman, Founder and Chief Technology Officer of UltraDNS Corporation ( http://www.ultradns.com). His operational responsibilities include defining and guiding the development of all technical initiatives within the company, as well as interaction with the standards bodies and working groups in the IETF, telecommunications, and network world.

    Mr Joffe has been involved in the IT world since 1973 when he trained as a systems analyst and programmer in the Pensions Actuarial group of the Old Mutual Life Insurance Company in Cape Town, South Africa. After co-founding Printronic Corporation of America (UK) Pty. LTD. in London, England, in 1977, he opened American Computer Group (ACG) - the first of his US based companies - in Los Angeles in 1983. He is still very involved in ACG as both the Chairman and acting CEO. ACG is one of the leading Data Processing Service Bureaus in the Direct Response advertising and marketing industry.

    In the early 1990’s, following the NSF disgorgement of commercial Internet traffic from the NSFNet, He launched Internet Media Network as the Internet division of ACG. In March of 1994, he established the first web-based online presence of a traditional mail-order company, Robert Redford’s Sundance Catalog. In 1996 in partnership with Bechtel Enterprises, Internet Media Network was renamed Genuity, which then went on to became one of the largest ISP Data Center Operators in the world. The company was driven by Hopscotch™, invented and patented by Mr Joffe, and the very first formal content distribution and load balancing technology. He remained as the Chief Technical Officer of Genuity until the end of 1997 when Genuity was acquired by GTE Corporation. He was then appointed Vice-President, Strategic Technologies, and Chief Technology Officer of the Business Services division of GTE Internetworking.

    Following his retirement from GTE Internetworking in 1999, he returned to Phoenix, Arizona, where he founded CenterGate Research Group, a technology think-tank that became the birthplace of UltraDNS, Catbird Networks, and a number of community focused services including Geektools ( http://www.geektools.com) and the whois-servers.net project.

    Mr Joffe sits on the boards of a number of technology companies, including Scientific Monitoring ( http://www.scientificmonitoring.com), an aerospace software company, and Plasmanet, one of the largest Internet database marketing networks. He is also an active member of the Faculty Advisory Board of the USC Viterbi School of Engineering in Los Angeles.

    Mr Joffe serves as a non-voting member of the Nominating Committee, selected by the Security and Stability Advisory Committee (SSAC).
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    Re:.XXX Meeting in .LA With Live Hollywood Porn St
    by Anonymous on Tuesday August 16 2005, @06:41AM (#15913)
    1

    Read the rest of this comment...

    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re:.XXX Meeting in .LA With Live Hollywood Porn St
    by Anonymous on Tuesday August 16 2005, @06:53AM (#15916)
    Entertainment Technology Task Force

    Co-chairs:

        * Max Gasparri, max.gasparri@warnerbros.com
        * Tad Marburg, tmarburg@pacbell.net.

    Description of Task Force:

    A recent report from the Milken Institute stated:
    "The entertainment industry plays an important role in the Los Angeles economy. For example:

        * The motion picture and television production industry directly accounts for roughly 185,000 jobs and $24 billion in output per year in Los Angeles County.
        * Los Angeles accounts for more than one quarter of the nation’s movie and television production, a larger national presence than New York in financial services, Detroit in automobile production, and Las Vegas in gambling.

    In 2000, Los Angeles accounted for 25 percent of the nation’s output of movie and television production. Motion picture and television production employment in Los Angeles increased from less than 70,000 in 1980 to roughly 185,000 in 2000. This growth rate was more rapid than in other sectors in Los Angeles, implying that movie and television production has played an increasingly large role in the economy over the past two decades."

    The goal of this task force is to investigate how the entertainment industry will incent and utilize a gigabit network in California.
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]


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