ICANNWatch
 
  Inside ICANNWatch  
Submit Story
Home
Lost Password
Preferences
Site Messages
Top 10 Lists
Latest Comments
Search by topic

Our Mission
ICANN for Beginners
About Us
How To Use This Site
ICANNWatch FAQ
Slash Tech Info
Link to Us
Write to Us

  Useful ICANN sites  
  • ICANN itself
  • Bret Fausett's ICANN Blog
  • Internet Governance Project
  • UN Working Group on Internet Governance
  • Karl Auerbach web site
  • Müller-Maguhn home
  • UDRPinfo.com;
  • UDRPlaw.net;
  • CircleID;
  • LatinoamerICANN Project
  • ICB Tollfree News

  •   At Large Membership and Civil Society Participation in ICANN  
  • icannatlarge.com;
  • Noncommercial Users Constituency of ICANN
  • NAIS Project
  • ICANN At Large Study Committee Final Report
  • ICANN (non)Members page
  • ICANN Membership Election site

  • ICANN-Related Reading
    Browse ICANNWatch by Subject

    Ted Byfied
    - ICANN: Defending Our Precious Bodily Fluids
    - Ushering in Banality
    - ICANN! No U CANN't!
    - roving_reporter
    - DNS: A Short History and a Short Future

    David Farber
    - Overcoming ICANN (PFIR statement)

    A. Michael Froomkin
    - When We Say US™, We Mean It!
    - ICANN 2.0: Meet The New Boss
    - Habermas@ discourse.net: Toward a Critical Theory of Cyberspace
    - ICANN and Anti-Trust (with Mark Lemley)
    - Wrong Turn in Cyberspace: Using ICANN to Route Around the APA & the Constitution (html)
    - Form and Substance in Cyberspace
    - ICANN's "Uniform Dispute Resolution Policy"-- Causes and (Partial) Cures

    Milton Mueller
    - Ruling the Root
    - Success by Default: A New Profile of Domain Name Trademark Disputes under ICANN's UDRP
    - Dancing the Quango: ICANN as International Regulatory Regime
    - Goverments and Country Names: ICANN's Transformation into an Intergovernmental Regime
    - Competing DNS Roots: Creative Destruction or Just Plain Destruction?
    - Rough Justice: A Statistical Assessment of the UDRP
    - ICANN and Internet Governance

    David Post
    - Governing Cyberspace, or Where is James Madison When We Need Him?
    - The 'Unsettled Paradox': The Internet, the State, and the Consent of the Governed

    Jonathan Weinberg
    - Sitefinder and Internet Governance
    - ICANN, Internet Stability, and New Top Level Domains
    - Geeks and Greeks
    - ICANN and the Problem of Legitimacy

    Highlights of the ICANNWatch Archive
    (June 1999 - March 2001)


     
    This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
    Groundbreaking NAF Decision in NEW.NET Domain Case | Log in/Create an Account | Top | 86 comments | Search Discussion
    Click this button to post a comment to this story
    The options below will change how the comments display
    Threshold:
    Check box to change your default comment view
    The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
    Re: Decision now available on http://www.steinle.l
    by simon on Tuesday September 03 2002, @12:49AM (#8942)
    User #2982 Info | http://www.nic.pro/
    "It doesn't cost money to distribute a plugin. Just because new.net pays money to get distributed as foistware doesn't mean it's the only way to distribute a plugin."
    --> Yes. But if you want to distribute fast it is better you bundle your plug-in with other popular software. You can download the New.net plug-in from download.com but it is not very popular. I doubt it would be different if one had to download a plug-in for Afilias' .info or Neulevels .biz.

    "Such ISP parnering may have been a good decision (I don't know what it cost them), but how long will those partnerships last, and at what cost? I don't think much longer. Then where is new.net?"
    --> I let Dan Sheehy, President of New.net counter that:
    "The company is about to close out its fourth straight profitable month. We just renewed our first three ISP deals. We're adding 7 million users each month. We're continuing to build our relationship with our first ICANN accredited registrar. We're in late stage discussions with a couple of the 800 pound gorillas in the ISP and Registrar businesses."
    http://new.chat.new.net/viewtopic.php?topic=3096&forum=3&start=30
    --> New.net has already renewed some ISP deals and New.net has the money to renew the others and to ADD MORE ISPS. :-)

    "With the USG you cover nearly 100% so why use another."
    --> I think you should ask this question the "alt-root" user. For many it is the reason to "show ICANN the red card". One can discuss the fugures, fact is WITH ORSC and PACROOT in additiom you reach more user than without.

    "Oh really? So there won't be any colliders? So every *.*.pro in the USG root will be no different than those in the nic.pro root? Then what's the point?"
    As we all know there are many "alt-root" users out there. Estimations goes from 0,5% to 12%. If these people would like to see a RegistryPro .pro site they had to change their DNS settings. If registrants also would register with NIC.PRO "alt-root" user won't have to change their network settings.

    "I've yet to see any advertising campaigns for any alt-root sites. I don't see why that makes for a selling feature. The USG root already gets near 100% coverage, and if you understand real marketing at all, that's plenty."
    -->Who talked about a advertising campaign for a alt root site? If one advertises a .pro site, (s)he does not advertise a "alt-root" nor a USG .pro site, (s)he simply advertises a .pro site. If one has registered the pro domain only with RegistryPro, one loses the traffic which could come from the "alt-root" users. "alt-root" users who see the advertising campaign may want to browse to the advertised .pro site but get an error message.
    If you understand real marketing at all, you should know that more traffic in return to you advertising costs should higher your ROI.

    "Well, I obviously misunderstood when you said you weren't charging for the names."
    --> This site was created on 2001-09-04. I think one should have the possibility to change his opinion in this time. Until now there wasn't that much interest in this domain names, therefore I thought FOR FREE is always good.
    You still fail to realise that one don't have to collect registration fees to make money. One Tip: Look what New.net is doing with error traffic ;-) (only one possibility).

    "or you're selling it to some potential speculator (and probable squatter), and and it's not transferable via the UDRP (though it probably is via other methods)"
    --> Do you really think UDRP should more TLDs? E.g. for .de (Germany, second most registrations after .com) we don't have a UDRP and it works. You don't need UDRP to get domain names back from suatters. And what's your problem with speculators. Don't you speculate with stocks?...ah no, you INVEST in stocks and don't speculate. ;-) Is e.g George Soros (big speculator) a bad mad? People speculate with everything, so they do with domain names. Some do it long term, some do it short term. Some develop their object of speculation (e.g. build a shopping center on a estate or put some content to domain names)

    "It doesn't matter if the first site doesn't actually get that 10% traffic (which it won't, that is an absurd figure), or even if the first name is operational."
    --> It does matter. You could establish prior rights to a name. But as I said you should build a UNIQUE site (98% of all sites are not unique) and you should not do this in bad faith like the sex.shop trademark registrant did it.

    "A neat trick, perhaps ironically not so unlike that which the TM registrant of sex.shop was trying on you, and which you can now use as an advertising vehicle. And I don't expect it to work any better for you than it did for him. -g"
    --> Don't compare me with this a....hole again.
    There is no trick!
    It all depends if you have bad faith with your domain name registration or not.
    Again, I will make sure that RegistryPro customers will get their corresponding domain name with NIC.PRO in addition FOR FREE (if they want).


    Btw. if no one (especially RegistryPro and Registrars) is interested in this solution which would prevent colliders in the .pro name space I see myself forced to change my strategy. There is already one small company which want to buy my .pro domain names (my registry ;-))for a low price. But what I hear from them they are willing to accept colliders in the .pro name space.
    RegistryPro wanted it this way.nic.PRO will be back online soon with FREE sub-domains. Dowload the FREE plug-in at
    www.name-space.com/software
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: Decision now available on http://www.steinle.l by simon


    Search ICANNWatch.org:


    Privacy Policy: We will not knowingly give out your personal data -- other than identifying your postings in the way you direct by setting your configuration options -- without a court order. All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner. The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 by ICANNWatch.Org. This web site was made with Slashcode, a web portal system written in perl. Slashcode is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.
    You can syndicate our headlines in .rdf, .rss, or .xml. Domain registration services donated by DomainRegistry.com