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    ICANN Meetings The Public Role In ICANN Meetings (Not)
    posted by michael on Thursday October 30 2003, @10:06AM

    Edward Hasbrouck encounters ICANN's unstinting committment to enabling the public voice (or, rather, its total contempt for the public now that the public has no power in ICANN):
    As with the last two ICANN board meetings, by the time the issue of new top-level Internet domain names (TLD's), including new Internet domain names for travel , was added to the agenda, it was too late for me to attend in person, even if I could have afforded to do so.

    I submitted comments by e-mail for the public forums at the previous two meetings, in Rio de Janeiro in March 2003 and in Montréal in June 2003 . I was prepared to do likewise for the public forum today in Carthage, although really I would only have reminded the ICANN board, and anyone watching or exercising oversight, that the same "problems"/icann/ I called to their attention months ago in Rio and Montreal continue unabated.

    According to the ICANN Web site , the open microphone (and, in the past, open e-mail) portion of the public forum was scheduled as its last segment, from 17:30-18:00 Carthage time (UTC/GMT +1) today, or 8:30-9:00 a.m. San Francisco time. But when I went to bed last night an e-mail address for public comments still hadn't been posted on the ICANN Web site.

    Overnight, an address for public comments, carthage@icann.org , was added to the ICANN Web page for the forum. As I addressed the e-mail message with my comments, I tuned in the live Webcast of the meeting -- and at 8:17 a.m. San Francisco time (17:17 Carthage time), just before I could send my e-mail comments and well before the open mike session was scheduled to begin, heard the public forum abruptly gavelled to adjournment!

    Thus closes the last remaining avenue open to the public through whcih to bring their concerns before the de facto governing body of the Internet.

    I'd like to hope that the minutes of the ICANN annual meeting will reflect the adjournment in advance of the scheduled open microphone period, to the exclusion of potential remote participation. But I wouldn't be at all surprised to see a retroactive re-write of the schedule in the minutes and on ICANN's Web site, to hide the fact that this last vestige of openness was eliminated.




     
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    · Also by michael
     
    This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
    The Public Role In ICANN Meetings (Not) | Log in/Create an Account | Top | 7 comments | Search Discussion
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    ICANN's Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely
    by srjmsbnd on Monday November 03 2003, @02:34PM (#12594)
    User #3894 Info | http://uk.geocities.com/srjmsbnd007/
    In reading:

    "Edward Hasbrouck encounters ICANN's unstinting commitment to enabling the public voice (or, rather, its total contempt for the public now that the public has no power in ICANN :"

    I am only reminded of the contractual nightmare presented by registrants of domain names by officially recognized registrars for ICANN in that those provisions have legal basises which go contrary to:

    1. The basis of our national sovereignty as national entities and individual rights

    2. Good common horse sense

    3. Better business practices

    4. Etc (by the way you can give me all your money without guarantees from me though I offer more accountability than ICANN registrars)

    where ICANN and its registrars has attempted to treat registrants as if they were some crack addict who are required to pay and pay and pay while ICANN and its registrars take and take and take ... without their recognition of any obligation to registrants (who can spend millions and years of man hours developing domain sites only to have it all taken away with ICANN or its registrars accepting any liability under law [national or international]) as such they are acting above the rule of law and wherefore act and exhibit the character traits of pirates / bandits.

    Whereas Yahoo has a affiliate with who it registers domains names as a service (Melbourneit.com) but when it registering it own domain names used a Swiss corporation and now alldomains.com but surely Yahoo's contracts and terms and conditions with such "people" (sic) are not the same as the ones you or I (mom and pop) are required to put up with. So frankly they can go to hell!
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    The ever-changing icann.org
    by fnord (groy2kNO@SPAMyahoo.com) on Tuesday November 04 2003, @11:51AM (#12596)
    User #2810 Info
    I've often documented www.icann.org being retroactively changed (without it being obvious, including false dates) apparently in response to public comments. I'd suggest grabbing those pages that may go down the memory drain. Google's archive and archive.org are only useful if ICANN is no longer using robots.txt.

    Speaking of archives, I see no mention on the ICANN site of when or if or where the realmedia stream might be made available. -g

    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re:ICANN meeting 30 Oct 2003
    by Richard_Henderson on Thursday October 30 2003, @04:02PM (#12576)
    User #3269 Info | http://www.atlarge.org/

    If they had more time, then I presume they were able to read out the 6 questions I sent them.

    I actually sent these at midday on 28th October, using the address which was already on the website by then, so I presume Edward was looking in a different place.

    I received an acknowledgement of receipt for each mail.

    I returned from visiting a sick relative in time to see/hear Joop and Amadeu raising some closing points, then Vint adjourned the meeting.

    I therefore don't know if any of my questions were read out, but I hope someone's were... otherwise what's the point of offering the facility.

    Commonsense says that people unable to attend, but regularly involved in ICANN debate, should be able to participate.

    Richard Henderson

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