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    Highlights of the ICANNWatch Archive
    (June 1999 - March 2001)


     
    Alternate Roots New Kid on the Block: XTNS
    posted by michael on Wednesday August 15 2001, @12:01PM

    fnord writes "It has Realnames, MicroSoft, multilingual names, is pre-checked for trademark protection, wants to work with ICANN including no colliders--there's a lot of ground covered here. It's best if you read it yourself.

    This looks much like the new.net on steroids I'd predicted here and elsewhere for some time."



    Both new.net and xtns aren't easily classifiable into Alternative Roots (or another ICANNWatch category) as they are really overlays on the DNS (using dissimilar methods). Therefore it comes as no surprise that xtns says it will do email, after a fashion, eventually. While new.net seems to have found its audience most with speculators, xtns is clearly aimed at larger corporations. Given that it is immediately functional without a plugin on a majority of the world's computers (they claim 88%, in most any language), I'd say this be one big dragon.

    Could it be that somewhere between the speculators and the corps, both now having their needs served by private for-profit interests, is a space where ICANN may yet find a use for, which is to say some legitimacy from, that vast majority of net users who are neither speculators nor corps? They'd best not tarry too long in finding that middle ground, or any ground, to stand on. There are other overlays in the works as well, and sooner or later one or more of them will decide to point directly at http://128.121.228.115 when one types in icannwatch, for example. ICANN will still control the netblocks but the DNS may become an evolutionary dead end. The TM/IP folks will have a much more difficult time controlling each iteration of each overlay in each language, hopefully rendering them largely superfluous. Speculating would also seem to be more difficult, or meaningless, if not impossible. It's 2001, time for the namespace on top of your IP to explode. -g

     
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    This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
    New Kid on the Block: XTNS | Log in/Create an Account | Top | 43 comments | Search Discussion
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    New Kids on the Block (not the early '90s teen pop
    by dtobias (dan@tobias.name) on Friday August 17 2001, @05:56AM (#1897)
    User #2967 Info | http://domains.dan.info/

    I've updated my page on "Alternate Roots" to mention (and criticize) XTNS:



    Dan's Domain Site: Alternate Roots

    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    • 1 reply beneath your current threshold.
    Why we don't need realnames
    by simon on Thursday August 16 2001, @04:53AM (#1860)
    User #2982 Info | http://www.nic.pro/
    Because users have that habit to navigate through the internet by typing in http://www.anything.TLD.

    Even newbies know that they need to type in something.TLD

    And why do advanced users need a keyword?
    They know how and where to find appropriate information.
    Realnames take by far more time to resolve (test it by typing in "realnames"). Why should i wait 30 sec., when I can get the same information by typing in realnames.com?

    Now that I write this, it comes to my mind, that this could be a major disadvantage of the potential future domains from xtns.
    But maybe they can solve this problem like New.net did it?

    But one thing we have to think about it: Realnames and Microsoft together serves 88 % of the internet user. They could offer their own .com extension and 88% od the users would be automatically browsed to the Microsoft .coms!
    nic.PRO will be back online soon with FREE sub-domains. Dowload the FREE plug-in at
    www.name-space.com/software
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New Kid on the Block: XTNS
    by simon on Thursday August 16 2001, @05:10AM (#1863)
    User #2982 Info | http://www.nic.pro/
    "Tell IBM or any other large corp. that this will reach only 88% of consumers and they would laugh you right out the door."

    This is possible. But why don't they laugh about .biz and .info?
    Only estimated 90 to 95% will reach the icann version of the .biz and .info domains!

    nic.PRO will be back online soon with FREE sub-domains. Dowload the FREE plug-in at
    www.name-space.com/software
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New Kid on the Block: XTNS
    by simon on Thursday August 16 2001, @09:37AM (#1865)
    User #2982 Info | http://www.nic.pro/
    that's what NS admin wrote:

    ...As far as collisions are concerned, the XTNS technology will not (so far as I can tell), take priority over any alternative root currently in operation on a user's computer. Internet Explorer only loads up the search page (which is, I believe, how RealNames is contacted) after a name is rejected by DNS. Please, anyone who has contrary information, let me know; I'm certainly not an expert in this area.

    Whether XTNS, or any other company, will in the long run be a threat to NameSlinger, only time will tell. But we won't go down without a fight!...

    The danger here is that MS explorer be changed to not give precedence to DNS resolution.nic.PRO will be back online soon with FREE sub-domains. Dowload the FREE plug-in at
    www.name-space.com/software
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: Na na Michael, XTNS isn't that big dragon...
    by simon on Thursday August 16 2001, @11:26AM (#1868)
    User #2982 Info | http://www.nic.pro/
    Hhis post was by me.
    I didn't want to post anonymously. It was a mistake.nic.PRO will be back online soon with FREE sub-domains. Dowload the FREE plug-in at
    www.name-space.com/software
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: Na na Michael, XTNS isn't that big dragon...
    by simon on Thursday August 16 2001, @11:28AM (#1869)
    User #2982 Info | http://www.nic.pro/
    This post was by me.
    I didn't want to post anonymously. It was a mistake.

    nic.PRO will be back online soon with FREE sub-domains. Dowload the FREE plug-in at
    www.name-space.com/software
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: Na na Michael, XTNS isn't that big dragon...
    by steve@new.net (SteveC) on Thursday August 16 2001, @12:26PM (#1874)
    User #2430 Info | www.new.net
    This is Steve Chadima responding. The above note was taken from the New.net Message Board and copied without attribution. I appreciate the support of the person posting this, but you should know the context in which it was created. There has been considerable discussion among our customers at the emergence of XTNS, and we wanted to clear the air.

    In this environment, I would only add the following: until ICANN becomes more responsive to obvious market demand for a more meaningful and expanded namespace, there will be more and more of these offerings. New.net was not the first challenge and won't be the last.

    Cheers,

    Steve
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New Kid on the Block: XTNS
    by fnord (groy2kNO@SPAMyahoo.com) on Thursday August 16 2001, @09:15PM (#1882)
    User #2810 Info
    Anon writes:
    Looks like your imagination is on steroids.
    I said I'd been predicting a new.net on steroids to come along and said it looked like XTNS might be it. It now seems apparent it isn't XTNS, though I'm not ready to count them out entirely. I'd thought previously, and still do, that the new.net on steroids may even be new.net, if they can introduce multilingual names, and if there are more than a few actual unique sites worth visiting.

    There is a bit of discussion in several spots on the message board about a new company, XTNS, that seems to be marketing a naming system that is strikingly similar to New.net.
    I didn't, and wouldn't, call it strikingly similar to new.net. It uses different technology as I said, and it (if it follows RealNames) isn't using generic, undifferentiated names.

    If you replace XTNS with Micro$oft then not only new.net but also ICANN are in for some trouble. And I don't doubt for a minute that M$ hasn't thought of that. -g

    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: Na na Michael, XTNS isn't that big dragon...
    by dtobias (dan@tobias.name) on Friday August 17 2001, @01:37AM (#1883)
    User #2967 Info | http://domains.dan.info/

    It's weird to see such sentiments in a post that is also anonymous.

    Registration here is free; how come so few avail themselves of it?

    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New Kid on the Block: XTNS
    by dtobias (dan@tobias.name) on Friday August 17 2001, @01:39AM (#1884)
    User #2967 Info | http://domains.dan.info/

    ...and your post is, too! This whole argument, with anonymous posters beating up on one another for being anonymous, seems like it ought to be a Monty Python skit...

    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: Chadima Should Check His Facts
    by dtobias (dan@tobias.name) on Friday August 17 2001, @01:45AM (#1885)
    User #2967 Info | http://domains.dan.info/

    At any rate, regardless of the size and seriousness of the company, what they're creating is not in any way "domain names". It's not even an alternate domain namespace like new.net. It's merely a portion of a proprietary "keyword" namespace that happens to have been formatted with dots in it to resemble domain names. It's no more an addition to the domain name system than is AOL's keywords, even if those start having dots in them as well.

    And, personally, I sure hope none of these schemes catch on... having people start using proprietary keywords, whether they're RealNames or AOL's, as if they were "Internet addresses" is a huge step in the wrong direction, away from a namespace that's established by open standards and accessible to all, and into a namespace that is accessible or not depending on what browser, platform, and connection provider you're using.

    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
    Re: New Kid on the Block: XTNS
    by dtobias (dan@tobias.name) on Friday August 17 2001, @05:52AM (#1896)
    User #2967 Info | http://domains.dan.info/
    ...which hasn't stopped XTNS's "cheerleaders" in this and other forums from proclaiming that proprietary system as "universal"... obviously, non-Windows platforms and non-MSIE browsers aren't part of their "universe". Are they on Bill Gates's payroll or something?
    [ Reply to This | Parent ]
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